Tag Archives: vendor

Tips for attending bride shows….. From a man’s prospective

Well gents, the wedding show season has begun, and if you’re lucky enough to be chosen to attend, your betrothed will probably be toting you around a bustling hotel or convention center, to shop for all the elements to create her dream wedding.
So to ease the tension and stress of feeling you’re just along for the ride, I’ll give you a few pointers to help you survive.

1) STAY AWAY FROM MAN CAVES!!
Some show promoters feature a man cave to give you some “relief” from walking around doing “girl things” all day (not a good idea). Truth be told, nothing could be more selfish than to volunteer to go to a show with your woman, knowing you had no intention of spending any time with her. I guarantee, SHE WON’T LIKE IT!
2) SHOW SOME INTEREST:
Hey, it’s your wedding too! You have decisions to make, and she brought you along because she respects your opinion (unless you have a bridezilla, then no one is safe), and it’s a great way to show solidarity as you face pushy vendors. And if she has no support, she could get bullied into choosing a vendor you won’t like.
3) BE PATIENT:
She may want to linger about with the vendors that interest her most. Take note, these will probably be the things you are going to discuss later. Besides, you don’t want to be the bad guy for rushing her through the show, do you?
4) GIVE POSITIVE INPUT:
Remember #2? Your opinion has great value if she brought you along. Don’t just say “yes dear” or “whatever she wants”. If she wants to share the experience, believe me, she’s going to want to know what you think.
5) STAY FOCUSED, STAY TOGETHER:
This is also a time for you to get a grasp on some of the things you may be interested in. You won’t believe how much you’ll begin to care, the closer you get to your date. And if you do happen to separate, at least make sure you have something in hand, to show you were serving a purpose. And I would advise not making too many excuses to run to the restroom, she’ll get a sense you won’t want to be there.

These hints come from my many years of exhibiting, and at one time, attending bride shows. The best you can do is give your best, and if you won’t be there in spirit, it’s best not to be there at all. Better than getting the mad eye or silent treatment on the way home, that’s a long ride!
Follow this advice, and it will be all good, shop well men, and enjoy the show!

~A~


A matter of courtesy: It’s alright to say no

The most difficult part of writing about this particular subject, without sounding bitter, or like I’m owed something, was trying to not make this personal.
Please understand, that is not the case, but I believe it is a subject that should be addressed. This is not a pricing issue (although it seems it could be), it is a matter of manners and reciprocal courtesy. I am speaking on behalf of other vendors that I have discussed this with as well.

Let me first begin by saying, no, I DO NOT expect every prospective client that calls, to book my services!

I’ve noticed an unfortunate growing trend amongst new prospects. After initiating first contact, they aren’t even courteous enough to return correspondence, once their prospective vendor has done their part in replying to a request. This is a strange thing to me, after attending a few focus groups, and reading different chatboards, one of the things most of the brides complained about, was the vendor they were interested in, did not reply quickly enough, if at all. So, why isn’t your prospective vendor entitled to the same courtesy?
The main question I would like to pose, if after you’ve made an inquiry, your vendor has promptly replied, and you are no longer interested, do you feel the next appropriate action is to ignore them? A lot of vendors in my industry are independent operators, which means you are dealing real people, not callous corporate entities, that will forget you the moment you hang up. This of course, is not everyone, but the number is growing.

The cyber world allows people to be even more distant than ever before, and making it more difficult to be personal in a situation that requires one to be personable. It is very misleading when speaking to a prospective client, everything seems to be going well, so you decide to call or e-mail back to follow up, and suddenly, they are impossible to get a hold of. I understand being busy, we all are when planning important events, but the time you could have taken to tell them you are not interested, is probably a lot shorter than the time it took to ask the numerous questions, that you were given all the answers to, before you decided to reject their services. You have basically told them that their time has no value to you. Would you like for your chosen vendor to not contact you, after they’ve found someone to fill your date? I’m sure that would not be a very pleasant surprise.

For some reason, it seems rudeness is the new standard of communication, and it is a one way street. Could you imagine if vendors took the same route as some of their prospective clients? The chatboards would be on fire with horrible reviews, and we would all be out of business!

Just remember, being polite is like having insurance, you never know when you may end up needing it (because that same person you ignored, might be the only one available in case something happens), but it’s always nice to have. Believe me, unlike the Alison Krauss song, it’s better to say “no”, than to say nothing at all.

~A~